Cairngorms National Park - Highland Perthshire, Aviemore, Glenlivet, Royal Deeside

Cairngorms National Park. Welcome to the Cairngorms Park accommodation and holiday blog. On Cairngorms-Park.com you'll find the widest range of self-catering holiday homes, hotels, guest houses, B&Bs, hostels and caravanning/camp sites situated in the Cairngorms Park, from Blair Atholl to Aviemore, into Glenlivet and Royal Deeside. You'll also find details of all the villages and tourist attractions in the Cairngorms Park, information on active-, water- and snow sports, including every annual event and festival. Look for our definitive guide to the Cairngorms National Park's golf courses, places to eat and drink, the best nightlife, distilleries and other world class visitor attractions. Your Cairngorms Park holiday starts here!

Set against the spectacular backdrop of the Cairngorm mountains and ancient Scots Pine Forests, Aviemore and The Cairngorms National Park remains Scotland's favourite all year round visitor destination. Whether you're skiing, snow boarding, climbing, walking or just touring, you'll be doing it in some of Europe's finest and most spectacular National Park.

Monday, 30 November 2009

Outdoor Activities at Cairngorms Holiday Cottages, Aviemore and the Cairngorms

Cairngorms Holiday Cottages.com....Number 1 for Holiday Accommodation in the Cairngorms National Park.

There is just so much to do in the Highlands - almost too much - that it would take a book to cover it all. The vistscotland video shows this...click below to watch Visit Scotland

Video.http://www.highlandholidaycottages.com/documents/VisitScotland%20Video.wmv

Our aim at www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com, is to give you a concise and factual overview of the main activities that you can take part in during your stay with us at one of our Cairngorms Holiday Cottages or Homes, Cairngorms, Aviemore in the Highlands of Scotland.

Within this wonderful Park, with its many picturesque towns & villages, numerous different activities & attractions and with its outstanding, varied scenery, there is just too much to see and to do for us to cover it all here. We've briefly mentioned what we see as the key places to visit in the paragraphs below and, for up to date information on the Park itself please click on this link. www.cairngorms.co.uk

This downloadable video clip runs for 90 seconds and features a variety of scenic views of the Cairngorms National Park. It was shot during the months of July and August 2003 and captures the landscapes around the boundaries of the park from Laggan to Lochnagar, from the head of Glen Clova to Carrbridge, and includes shots of Ruthven Barracks, Loch an' Eilean and the standing stones to the west of Grantown. It also features footage taken of the Funicular Railway at Cairngorm; water sports at Loch Morlich and the Osprey Centre near Nethy Bridge.

in reference to: Highland Holiday Homes self catering accommodations Newtonmore near Aviemore (view on Google Sidewiki)

Sunday, 29 November 2009

Boar to clear bracken for trees

SIX wild boar were encouraged to snack on bracken yesterday when they were released into a 30-acre forest enclosure west of Loch Ness.

The animals were taken to the Dundreggan Estate in Glen Moriston as a “secret weapon” to help kick-start a forest restoration project by Findhorn-based charity Trees for Life.

The organisation hopes the animals will reduce the amount of bracken at the site, encouraging the regeneration of native trees and woodland plants.

The charity aims to restore 580 square miles of Caledonian forest in the Highlands.

The woodland once covered vast areas of Scotland but only 1% of it survives.

More than 800,000 trees have been planted by the charity since its first project in Glen Affric in 1991.

Volunteers headed to a wet Dundreggan Estate yesterday to launch the wild boar project.

The six beasts, two adults and four young, have been donated by the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Highland Wildlife Park at Kincraig, near Kingussie.

It is hoped they will naturally control bracken, which grows very fast and can inhibit the growth of other plants by overshadowing them.

Boar can also help plants germinate by rooting and exposing areas of soil.

The charity’s executive director, Alan Watson Featherstone, said the boar project was important.

“Wild boar are an integral part of the Caledonian forest, and their presence is crucial to the ecological health and balance of a natural woodland,” he said.

See www.treesforlife.org.uk for further details.

Read more: http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1501157?UserKey=#ixzz0YKKWT0QC

in reference to: Boar to clear bracken for trees - Press & Journal (view on Google Sidewiki)

Saturday, 28 November 2009

Cairngorm Mountain could open this weekend

The Scottish resort hopes to re-open on 28 November following annual maintenance
The base station at Cairngorm on 27 November
View from the base station webcam at Cairngorm on 27 November

The operations crew at Cairngorm has been working hard to open up terrain for snowsports this weekend. The resort will open the mountain railway and plans to open the Ciste and Ptarmigan tows if weather conditions allow.

The resort has recently experienced blustery snow showers and is expecting more over the weekend. High winds may also be a factor, causing significant wind chill in high areas. Despite the chilly temperatures, continued snow could make a run to the middle possible which is good news for visitors.

The Ski Club’s Cairngorm snow report will start as soon as data is available for the resort. For conditions this weekend read the resorts blog at blog.cairngormmountain.co.uk.
Related items on skiclub.co.uk

in reference to:

"Cairngorm Mountain could open this weekend"
- Latest News - Ski Club of Great Britain (view on Google Sidewiki)

Friday, 27 November 2009

Carrbridge in the Caimgorms Park

Carrbridge, in The Cairngorms National Park is a Beautiful Highland Village just 7 miles north of Aviemore.

 

Carrbridge, in the Cairngorms National park is absolutely lovely. This beautiful village is known as the original ski area of Scotland, and it is the first. It is also known for its many stone bridges. These arched bridges were built in order to accommodate work horses. There are many still standing today.

 

"Landmark forest Adventure Park" is a great opportunity for an outing with the kids. There is so much to explore, you are sure to be kept busy all day, and will want to return again, and again. From water coasters to "sky diving" the thrills are sure to please. Here you may climb the tallest fire tower in the country, and meet the Clydesdale horses. The kids are sure to be delighted with all there is to do here.

 

"Highland wildlife park" in Kincraig is another attraction that is sure to delight young and old alike. Here you will drive your own car through the reserve, watching the wild animals in their own habitat. There are many traditional Scottish animals as well as other exotic, wild animals from around the world, such as Snow Monkeys and Polar Bears. They even have a program where you may become "warden for the day", where you may get up close, and help to feed, train and clean the animals. You must be eighteen or over for this one, but what an exciting adventure. If you live locally and have kids, it makes economic sense to become a member of the Park, once a member you can visit for free as many times as you wish.

 

Explore the beauty of the ancient stone bridges that you will find in Carrbridge. Spend the day skiing in one of the finest resorts in this area, followed by a fantastic meal in one of the many excellent restaurants in the Caimgorms National Park . Enjoy the walking trails, or have a picnic. No matter what you choose, you will have a wonderful time while visiting Carrbridge. Check www.Carrbridge.com village web site for more info.

 

Thursday, 26 November 2009

Stormy winter weather causes havoc

Gales disrupt roads and shipping while blizzards hit the cairngorms

A TASTE of winter came to the north of Scotland yesterday, with gales disrupting shipping and a snow falling on the higher mountains.

Weather conditions around the west and north coasts were so fierce that few ferries were sailing, bringing traffic disruption and stranding travellers.

The west coast took a battering from high seas, and CalMac was forced to cancel 12 ferry sailings, including between Oban and the isles and Ullapool and Stornoway.

A further nine services experienced disruption throughout the day. At one point only six vessels were plying the CalMac routes.

Despite strong winds, Northern Constabulary reported no structural damage to trees or buildings

But the Skye and Kessock bridges were closed to high-sided vehicles. Heavy surface water on most roads posed a hazard for drivers.

The A83 Oban-Lochgilphead road was closed for more than an hour while efforts were made to recover a lorry that had earlier been involved in an accident.
Snowplough

Warnings were issued to hillwalkers as the Cairngorm tops were swept by 150mph winds creating blizzard conditions.

Ski centre spokesman Colin Kirkwood said: “We have had a bit of snow and signs are hopeful of another good ski-ing season if it continues. We even had the snowplough out at one stage.”

The rest of the Highlands were hit by regular gusts of around 40-60mph, said the Met Office. A spokesman said similar weather was forecast for the next couple of days.

An injured teenage fisherman was forced to wait 10 hours for hospital treatment after a rescue attempt was abandoned in the “horrendous” conditions.

The 19-year-old suffered back injuries and a fractured ankle aboard the Inverness-registered Adventurer II, which was 30 miles west of the isolated St Kilda archipelago in the Atlantic.

Stornoway Coastguard scrambled its search and rescue helicopter at about 11.20pm on Tuesday and it arrived on the scene around an hour later.

Once there, weather conditions made it impossible for the winchman to be lowered on to the deck of the boat, being pounded by 70mph winds in 30ft seas. The rescue was abandoned and the skipper of the Adventurer II told to head back towards the Butt of Lewis so the trawler was more sheltered for a second pick-up attempt.

The helicopter was scrambled again at about 10am yesterday and the injured man airlifted to Stornoway Airport.

He was then taken the short distance by ambulance to Western Isles Hospital.

Read more: http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1499433?UserKey=#ixzz0Y022yIR0


Read more: http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1499433?UserKey=#ixzz0Y0214gj2

in reference to: Stormy winter weather causes havoc - Press & Journal (view on Google Sidewiki)

Scottish Festive Holiday

Scottish festive holiday and snow sport season time is around the corner and it’s time to plan where to go and what sort of self-catering accommodation in Aviemore and the Cairngorms National Park you prefer. If you dislike the hustle and bustle of busy hotels or staying in a Bed and Breakfast where you have to get up each morning, what are your options!

 

You can rent a caravan or hire a tent, not really suited for this time of year! Or you could decide to take a lovely warm holiday home or cottage. Holiday cottages come in all shapes and sizes tiny ones for two people or large ones for ten to twelve people or more. They can be quaint and rustic or up to date 5 Star with all the mod cons. Like Mountain Bear Lodge near Aviemore.

 

You can find a But n Ben Cottage with a loch view, such as at Loch Morlich or Insh, which is every ones picture of a real cottage, or many of them have a hot tubs or games rooms for kids, such as Crubenbeg!

 

They can be in the depth of the Cairngorms National Park away from it all, where woodland and wild flowers are in abundance, or in a village, such as Aviemore, where the local shop sells anything and everything.

 

If you like the idea of farming life where the children can see the highland cows and feed the hens, you’re in luck because many highland farms rent out the little cottages on their land some even have a horse to ride, such as Alvie Estate.

 

Ice Climbing and hiking holidays are very popular for the fit and hardy in the Cairngorms National Park, you can find a cottage or a cosy wooden chalet on the side of a Cairngorm Mountain in the Scottish Highlands.

 

Cottages are everywhere and it is not only the summer time when they can be enjoyed. Even in the middle of winter you can curl up in front of a real log fire or wrap up warmly and face the elements of a wintry countryside. Check out the 3 Ski centres in the Cairngorms National Park for Snow conditions. www.cairngormmountain.com www.lecht.co.uk www.ski-glenshee.co.uk

 

Many cottages allow dogs; imagine their delight with so much open space and all the different smells that send them ecstatic with joy.

 

Cairngorms Holiday Cottages, the first web site solely dedicated to listing all self-catering cottages, houses, lodges, bungalows, log cabins and bothies in the Cairngorms National Park. With interactive map search, advanced search engine, quick check and enquiry system. The site will also list what's on every month, places to see, do and visit in the Cairngorms National Park, along with all the information you need to plan your holiday in the Cairngorms National Park. We hope to launch this site very soon, so do check back regularly.....for now why not check out our village sites for accommodation ideas :

 

www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com

www.NewtonmoreHolidayCottages.com 

www.AviemoreHolidayCottages.com 

www.KingussieHolidayCottages.com

www.LagganHolidayCottages.com

www.TomintoulHolidayCottages.com

www.BraemarHolidayCottages.com

www.BallaterHolidayCottages.com

www.CarrbridgeHolidayCottages.com

www.BoatofgartenHolidayCottages.com

www.KincraigHolidayCottages.com

www.GrantownHolidayCottages.com

 

Wednesday, 25 November 2009

RSPB bird reserve plans to replace noisy generator

A RSPB reserve in the Highlands plans to replace a noisy generator which has been blamed for a humming noise and poor picture quality on its webcasts.

The Loch Garten reserve has a webcam showing an osprey nesting site, which is streamed on the internet.

Reserve staff hope to raise funds towards the £109,000 cost of connecting to mains electricity, cutting reliance on the gas generator.

The project involves burying a cable underground for more than a mile.

In a posting on the reserve's blog, manager Richard Thaxton said the generator was unable to cope with technology needed to run the webcam and faster internet speeds.

Updates are provided over the internet on young osprey raised in the nest and satellite tagged so their migration to Africa can be tracked.

in reference to:

"A RSPB reserve in the Highlands plans to replace a noisy generator which has been blamed for a humming noise and poor picture quality on its webcasts.The Loch Garten reserve has a webcam showing an osprey nesting site, which is streamed on the internet. Reserve staff hope to raise funds towards the £109,000 cost of connecting to mains electricity, cutting reliance on the gas generator. The project involves burying a cable underground for more than a mile. In a posting on the reserve's blog, manager Richard Thaxton said the generator was unable to cope with technology needed to run the webcam and faster internet speeds. Updates are provided over the internet on young osprey raised in the nest and satellite tagged so their migration to Africa can be tracked."
- BBC News - RSPB bird reserve plans to replace noisy generator (view on Google Sidewiki)

Badenoch Villages - Cairngorms National Park

This blog was brought to you by Cairngorms Holiday Cottages the only place to find self catering holiday accommodation in the Cairngorms National Park. CHC, more than just an accommodation portal, it’s a Cairngorms National Park Visitors Information Portal.

 

Aviemore -

Aviemore (Scottish Gaelic: An Aghaidh Mhòr) is a town and tourist resort, situated within the Cairngorms National Park in the Highlands of Scotland. It is the first skiing resort to be established in Scotland and is also notable for being near the freely grazing reindeer herd at Glen More, the only one in the United Kingdom.

 

Aviemore lies on the B9152 (the "old" A9 road since the main road from Inverness to Perth was rebuilt further west in the 1980s). Aviemore railway station is on the Highland Main Line and Aviemore is also the southern terminus of the Strathspey Railway, a heritage railway, currently being extended to Grantown-on-Spey. Over the last decade Aviemore has grown from a large village, to a town and continues to grow with hundreds of new houses planned in 2010-11.

 

Aviemore is the hub for nightlife, having the only highlight clubs in the Cairngorms National Park.  As such Aviemore has become the main feature for young people looking for some après ski nightlife.  Weekend stag and hen parties are a regular feature unfortunately.

 

 

Kingussie

Kingussie (Gaelic: Ceann a' Ghiuthasaich) (pronounced king-yewsie).  The name "Kingussie" comes from the Gaelic, "Ceann a' Ghiuthsaich" which means "Head of the Pines". Kingussie is a small town and is head of Badenoch and Strathspey, Highland, Scotland, adjacent to the A9 road, although the old route of the A9 served as the town's main street. Kingussie is the capital of the district of Badenoch and is 3 miles from Newtonmore, which is its greatest rival in the game of Shinty. Kingussie have been the dominant team in Shinty for the last 20 years although Newtonmore had it for 20 years before this and indeed have been recognised by the Guinness Book of Records as being the most successful sporting side in history.

 

The ruins of the early 18th century Ruthven Barracks (Historic Scotland; open to visitors at all times) lie near the original site of the village which was moved to avoid the flood plain of the River Spey.  It’s free to visit and walk around. There is usually a few Highland Cows guarding the entrance…..friendly highland cows!

 

The main railway line to Inverness passes through from Edinburgh, Glasgow and points south. Kingussie railway station is about 200 metres south east of the High Street. In the past few years, the TV series Monarch of the Glen has been filmed in and around the area of Kingussie.

 

The Highland Wildlife Park is sited very close by with now Snow Monkeys and a Polar Bear.  Rumours are that some other big cats may be on their way next year!?! We will be one of the first to post the news so keep an eye on our blog. The Highland Folk Museum is in Newtonmore, 3 miles from Kingussie. It is free and well worth the visit. There is a great but rather hilly golf course at Kingussie. Kingussie also has the best butcher that has award winning pies, sausages and meats. Kingussie also boasts Food on Film Festival, which is gaining in strength year after year....a must for foodies.

 

 

Newtonmore

Newtonmore (Baile Ur an t-Slèibh in Gaelic) is a village in the Highlands of Scotland with a population of about 1000. The village is only a few miles from a location that is claimed to be the exact geographical centre of Scotland.

 

Shinty - The town is renowned for having a shinty team, Newtonmore Camanachd Club.

Walking - Newtonmore calls itself the "Walking Centre of Scotland", referring both to its geographical location and to the great walking opportunities locally, like the Wildcat Trail. An extension to the Speyside Way could soon add Newtonmore to a Long Distance Route and it will become the new end to this trail. The road up the back of the village called the Old Glen Road is worth a drive, walk or cycle.

 

Golf - Newtonmore has a golf course on the banks of the Spey, the 1st Par 3 is claimed to be one of the hardest in the Valley. Bowling. The club is open to visitors. It has regular competitions with other clubs in Badenoch and Strathspey and with clubs from Perthshire and Aberdeenshire. Mountain Biking - Lots of trails in the local forests and tracks on the surrounding hills, as well as the purpose build Wolftrax MTB trails at nearby Laggan.  Horse Riding and Pony Trekking: Pony Trekking was credited with being started in Newtonmore in 1952 by Ewan Ormiston, it is still possible to ride in Newtonmore with his grandson Ruaridh at the Newtonmore Riding Centre. Ormiston

 

Laggan

Laggan is a village in Badenoch, in the Highland region of Scotland. It is beside the River Spey, about 10 km west of Newtonmore. The A86 road passes through the village and crosses the river on a nearby bridge. It featured as the fictional village of Glenbogle in the BBC TV drama series Monarch of the Glen. Laggan is in the Cairngorms National Park. Ruins of a Pictish fort can be found near Strathmashie, Laggan. The Laggan Wolftrax, a mountain biking centre located in the nearby Strathmashi Forest, opened in 2004. This facility, owned by the Forestry Commission, features over 17 km of purpose-built trails. The Laggan Stores is still a regular tourist visit hot spot and has perhaps could be classed as the “best stocked little village shop” in the Highlands. The salmon fishing under Laggan Bridge is claimed to be a great spot, permits can be bought at the Lagan Stores of locally at most shops.

 

Ardverikie Estate, where Monarch of the Glen was filmed, is about 12 miles from Kingussie. You can park in a lay-by across from the Gatehouse and hike back to the 'Big House'. It is about an 8 mile round trip hike but is well worth it, especially if you are a Monarch of the Glen fan.

 

 

Dalwhinnie

Dalwhinnie (Scottish Gaelic: Dail Chuinnidh; NN634848) is a tiny village in the Scottish Highlands. It is a little north of Drumochter, and functions mainly as a service stop. Because the pass is often closed in winter, this is seasonal. This village is probably the least pretty of all villages in the Cairngorms National Park. It definitely needs some improvement having a number of derelict buildings lining its high street.

 

Dalwhinnie is also the site of a railway station on the Highland Main Line from Perth to Inverness. The light, heathery Single Malt Scotch that bears the town's name is also made here (the highest-elevation working distillery in Scotland). Dalwhinnie Single Malt Scotch is part of the Diageo Range. The Inn at Dalwhinnie offers some great locally sources food at good prices.

 

To find out more about anything in this blog please check out Cairngorms Holiday Cottages, more than just an accommodation portal, it’s a Cairngorms National Park Information Portal. For local news buy the Strathy and support our local newspaper.

 

 

Tuesday, 24 November 2009

Your Cairngroms holiday choice makes a natural difference

By choosing a green tourism holiday, you can have the trip of your dreams, while benefiting the environment and the local people in the Cairngorms National Park. Green tourism, is holidaying with a purpose. When choosing travel, accommodation and what to do when you arrive, consider which ones work to protect the Cairngorms environment and benefit local communities

From the airport, you hire a green car, such as a Toyota Prius Hybrid, or get it dropped off at any of the main rail stations. Or if you prefer you can, once you're settled in, travel the park by heather hopper, or get a mountain bike delivered to your door, or the old fashioned way, by foot. The heather hopper bus service travels on a 'hail and ride' principle where those wishing to travel just stick out their hand and hail the bus!. This reliable and flexible travel service encourages people to leave the car. Accommodation providers will be happy to pick you up.



When planning your sleeping arrangements think green. There are many accommodation providers in the Cairngorms National Park that have shown their commitment to reducing their impact on the environment by signing up to the Green Business Tourism Scheme (GBTS). Throughout this site you will see the Green Tourism Logo which signifies that the person you are about to do business with, runs their business in a green fashion.



It might sound like obvious stuff, but sometimes when we're travelling we forget how we live at home, like picking up our rubbish after a picnic and recycling it, not flushing sanity wastes down the toilet. Remember wherever you live, you should respect the natural balance of the environment and take care to support and respect the Cairngorms National Park.

When you explore, why not participate in a Cairngorms activity like a Highland Games or Ceilidh? This way you really get the chance to understand local cultures and traditions, not to mention have a great day out! Remember, there are so many ways you can get to know and add value to the local environment and culture. Try anything from visiting local farmers markets, ensuring you use bio-degradable products during your trip or making a list of green business you would like to visit.

Try to buy local products and souvenirs whenever possible instead of those that have been flown or shipped in from overseas. Check out Creative Cairngorms. You'll support the local economy and get a holiday memory that's real worth having. Treat the locals with respect. Learn a few words in the native language Gaelic, be open to cultural differences. Consider taking a volunteer vacation to give back directly to the place you're visiting.

in reference to:

"From the airport, you hire a green car, such as a Toyota Prius Hybrid, or get it dropped off at any of the main rail stations. Or if you prefer you can, once you're settled in, travel the park by heather hopper, or get a mountain bike delivered to your door, or the old fashioned way, by foot. The heather hopper bus service travels on a 'hail and ride' principle where those wishing to travel just stick out their hand and hail the bus!. This reliable and flexible travel service encourages people to leave the car. Accommodation providers will be happy to pick you up.     When planning your sleeping arrangements think green. There are many accommodation providers in the Cairngorms National Park that have shown their commitment to reducing their impact on the environment by signing up to the Green Business Tourism Scheme (GBTS). Throughout this site you will see the Green Tourism Logo which signifies that the person you are about to do business with, runs their business in a green fashion.     It might sound like obvious stuff, but sometimes when we're travelling we forget how we live at home, like picking up our rubbish after a picnic and recycling it, not flushing sanity wastes down the toilet. Remember wherever you live, you should respect the natural balance of the environment and take care to support and respect the Cairngorms National Park.     When you explore, why not participate in a Cairngorms activity like a Highland Games or Ceilidh? This way you really get the chance to understand local cultures and traditions, not to mention have a great day out! Remember, there are so many ways you can get to know and add value to the local environment and culture. Try anything from visiting local farmers markets, ensuring you use bio-degradable products during your trip or making a list of green business you would like to visit.     Try to buy local products and souvenirs whenever possible instead of those that have been flown or shipped in from overseas. Check out Creative Cairngorms. You'll support the local economy and get a holiday memory that's real worth having. Treat the locals with respect. Learn a few words in the native language Gaelic, be open to cultural differences. Consider taking a volunteer vacation to give back directly to the place you're visiting."
- GreenTourisim (view on Google Sidewiki)

Cairngorms National Park ( www.Cairngorms.co.uk ) is a paradise for families, with its child-friendly culture, summer sunshine, great mountains, lochs and rivers and good value food and the Cairngorms Holiday Cottages village guides suggests a whole range of holiday ideas. Self catering, for instance, Family Business is a good, easy-going option for a low cost family holiday. Scottish self catering homes offer excellent facilities, lots of family fun and the chance for adults and children to explore the Cairngorms National Park.

 

For teenagers, self-catering is the perfect option. Relax in a big, rambling country house where the whole family can enjoy the garden, satellite TV, cycling and sightseeing. Young children, too, are blissfully happy with this type of break and the website has plenty of properties in all parts of Cairngorms National Park.

 

The web site also suggests fun and informative theme parks to visit when based at a Cairngorms Holiday Cottages, self catering holiday property, from magical Waltzing Waters to the fascinating Kingussie Highland Folk Museum or fun and learn park at Landmark, located in Carrbridge.

 

Families travelling in a large group can holiday together and save money. The price per person at a generously sized self catering property in rural Cairngorms National Park can be amazingly low.

 

Driving to or in Cairngorms National Park. Many holiday makers choose to drive through Cairngorms National Park to their holiday destination. Taking the car can now prove swift, comfortable and trouble-free, using the new Driving in Cairngorms National Park guide at www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com  Why not even check out our going green in the Cairngorms National Park for some green transports tips, among many other green tips, to make your Cairngorms trip Natural.

 

There are tips on planning your journey, finding quiet roads, and sightseeing trips. Travelling by car, you can usually take more luggage than on a plane or train - and enjoy some of the scenery and culture of Cairngorms National Park along the way. Highland roads are generally of high quality with little congestion, so driving can be a real pleasure.

 

Sunday, 22 November 2009

Forestry Operations Divert Laggan Wolftrax

Mountain bikers planning to head up to Laggan Wolftrax from some winter trail bashing are advised to be ready for some detours. Forestry Commission Scotland has begun felling trees adjacent to the forest roads along which some of the routes run.

The work – carried out in partnership with Laggan Forest Trust – will only be carried out Monday to Friday and is expected to be completed before Easter next year.

Jim Gillies for the Commission in Glenmore, said: “We’ve scheduled the work for the quietest time of the year when there aren’t so many people coming along – so hopefully it won’t cause too much disruption. Route diversions will be in place during the week and cyclists will be diverted along the pony paths – so everyone should observe any safety notices and diversions for obvious reasons!”

The main uphill route will be open at weekends and once the felling operations are complete it is hoped that a new Blue Route, taking users off the existing forest road, can be developed. All operations will be suspended during the Christmas & New Year holidays.

Basecamp will be open for business as usual.

in reference to:

"Mountain bikers planning to head up to Laggan Wolftrax from some winter trail bashing are advised to be ready for some detours. Forestry Commission Scotland has begun felling trees adjacent to the forest roads along which some of the routes run. The work – carried out in partnership with Laggan Forest Trust – will only be carried out Monday to Friday and is expected to be completed before Easter next year. Jim Gillies for the Commission in Glenmore, said: “We’ve scheduled the work for the quietest time of the year when there aren’t so many people coming along – so hopefully it won’t cause too much disruption. Route diversions will be in place during the week and cyclists will be diverted along the pony paths – so everyone should observe any safety notices and diversions for obvious reasons!” The main uphill route will be open at weekends and once the felling operations are complete it is hoped that a new Blue Route, taking users off the existing forest road, can be developed. All operations will be suspended during the Christmas & New Year holidays. Basecamp will be open for business as usual."
- Singletrack World » Forestry Operations Divert Laggan Wolftrax (view on Google Sidewiki)

Saturday, 21 November 2009

Wading birds in the Cairngorms National Park

Farmers, crofters and land managers with an interest in helping wading birds in the Cairngorms National Park are being urged to consider applying for government funds to help protect and enhance habitats to ensure the area remains a stronghold for birds such as lapwing, redshank, curlew and snipe.

Badenoch and Strathspey is the most important mainland area for breeding waders in the UK, and farmers and crofters – and how the land is managed – are key factors in supporting such high densities.

However, despite the area being a stronghold, the numbers of breeding waders in Badenoch and Strathspey has declined by 28% between 2000 and 2005, with lapwing numbers showing the most worrying decrease at 76%.

Three farms near Carrbridge have just been awarded £9,000 in the latest round of funding announcements from the Scotland Rural Development Programme (SRDP) Rural Priorities scheme.

Karen Sutcliffe, site manager for the RSPB at the national park’s Insh Marshes, said: “RSPB Scotland welcomes the opportunity this partnership offers to target SRDP funds towards the nationally-important breeding wader population on Strathspey farms.

“Declines in this population in recent years are of serious concern, and ensuring that wetland and wet grassland habitats are kept in good condition is essential to its survival.

“We believe that this partnership can help do that by supporting collaborative SRDP applications with a focus on breeding wader habitats throughout the length of Strathspey.”

With three new farms now involved in the Strathspey Wader Initiative that brings the total number of farms in the area using wader-friendly farming techniques to nine, and it is hoped that more will come on board.


Read more: http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1492226?UserKey=#ixzz0XU2KG8U1

 

Friday, 20 November 2009

Glencoe welcomed back into ski-scotland

THE BODY responsible for promoting Scotland’s ski resorts has welcomed the new owners of Glencoe Ski Centre as members.
Glencoe’s future as a snowsports venue had been in doubt until a consortium led by Falkirk businessman Andy Meldrum bought the business from previous owner David Campbell last month, securing around six full time and 30 seasonal jobs.


Mr Meldrum last week renewed Glencoe’s membership of the Scottish Snowsports Marketing Group, better known to skiers as ski-scotland, and is looking forward to the partnership bearing fruit as the 2009-10 ski season approaches.
Mr Meldrum said: ‘We are so pleased to have the opportunity to be part of ski-scotland. It makes sense to promote all Scotland’s ski areas together, as combining resources will allow us to market Glencoe more effectively as part of the Scottish snowsports product.’
The marketing group promotes Scottish snowsports on a collaborative basis, even although Scotland’s ski areas are also competitors.
Ski-scotland chairman Heather Negus, marketing manager at Nevis Range, said: ‘We are absolutely delighted that the sale of Glencoe has gone ahead in time for full winter operation and that Glencoe’s new owners have confirmed so quickly that they wish to work with us right from the start. It is very important to us that the group includes all five of Scotland’s mountain snowsports areas.
‘With this week’s cold weather and snow now on the mountain tops, this is a great time to have news like this to share with our loyal skiers and snowboarders.’ The news means skiers and boarders who have bought ski-scotland all-area season tickets can use them not only at Cairngorm Mountain, Glenshee, The Lecht and Nevis Range, but at Glencoe too.
The Lochaber resort will also continue to feature alongside the other ski areas on the ski-scotland.com website, where snow and road conditions are updated as and when they change each day throughout the winter.
Skiers and boarders can also see real-time conditions through webcams at each ski area. Glencoe was officially re-opened at a ceremony on Sunday morning.

in reference to:

"THE BODY responsible for promoting Scotland’s ski resorts has welcomed the new owners of Glencoe Ski Centre as members.Glencoe’s future as a snowsports venue had been in doubt until a consortium led by Falkirk businessman Andy Meldrum bought the business from previous owner David Campbell last month, securing around six full time and 30 seasonal jobs. PHPADS_showZone(20); Mr Meldrum last week renewed Glencoe’s membership of the Scottish Snowsports Marketing Group, better known to skiers as ski-scotland, and is looking forward to the partnership bearing fruit as the 2009-10 ski season approaches. Mr Meldrum said: ‘We are so pleased to have the opportunity to be part of ski-scotland. It makes sense to promote all Scotland’s ski areas together, as combining resources will allow us to market Glencoe more effectively as part of the Scottish snowsports product.’ The marketing group promotes Scottish snowsports on a collaborative basis, even although Scotland’s ski areas are also competitors.Ski-scotland chairman Heather Negus, marketing manager at Nevis Range, said: ‘We are absolutely delighted that the sale of Glencoe has gone ahead in time for full winter operation and that Glencoe’s new owners have confirmed so quickly that they wish to work with us right from the start. It is very important to us that the group includes all five of Scotland’s mountain snowsports areas.‘With this week’s cold weather and snow now on the mountain tops, this is a great time to have news like this to share with our loyal skiers and snowboarders.’ The news means skiers and boarders who have bought ski-scotland all-area season tickets can use them not only at Cairngorm Mountain, Glenshee, The Lecht and Nevis Range, but at Glencoe too. The Lochaber resort will also continue to feature alongside the other ski areas on the ski-scotland.com website, where snow and road conditions are updated as and when they change each day throughout the winter. Skiers and boarders can also see real-time conditions through webcams at each ski area. Glencoe was officially re-opened at a ceremony on Sunday morning."
- Glencoe welcomed back into ski-scotland - The Oban Times (view on Google Sidewiki)

Responsible Dog Ownership Cairngorms

The 3,800 square kilometre Cairngorms National Park welcomes around 1.4 million visitors annually, many of which are dog owners. While visitors and are encouraged, they need to be mindful that areas such as these are home to vulnerable wildlife as well as landowners and farmers.

This has led to the Cairngorms National Park Authority (CNPA) launching an awareness raising campaign to educate dog owners on what it means to be a responsible dog owner in the Scottish countryside and about the issues that can exist between their pets, farmers’ livestock and wildlife. The campaign is based around three key messages about dogs relating to farming; natural heritage and dogs in public open spaces.

As a country estate set within the Cairngorms National Park, Glen Tanar is supporting CNPA’s campaign by jointly hosting a ‘Dogs and the Code’ responsible dog ownership educational event aimed at local residents.

Michael Bruce, Glen Tanar Estate Owner, says, “While we actively encourage visitors and want our countryside to be enjoyed, we do not want this to be at the expense of nature. Glen Tanar is home to an abundance of wildlife including deer and rare capercaillie making it essential that dogs are kept under close control and do not chase such wildlife. Ideally dogs should be kept on a short lead during the bird breeding season so not to upset or harm ground nesting birds or disturb their nests.

“By supporting CNPA’s campaign through hosting this event, which will take place in February, Glen Tanar can work with the local community to encourage responsible behaviour among dog owners and ensure greater compliance with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. This is turn will ensure the safety of our visitors as well as the conservation of the wildlife.”

Justin Prigmore, CNPA’s Outdoor Access Officer says, “The Cairngorms National Park is home to 16,000 residents and tourism related business accounts for 80% of the park’s economy. The support received by Glen Tanar in conveying our message to its local residents and visitors is very welcomed as only by working with local landowners can our campaign be a success”.

There are nine key points that The Scottish Outdoor Access Code recommends to dog owners, which are promoted at CNPA ‘Dogs and the Code’ events:

· Don’t take your dog into fields where there are lambs, calves or other young animals

· Don’t take your dog into fields of vegetables or fruit unless you are on a clear path, such as a core path or right of way, but keep your dog to the path

· Never let your dog worry or attack farm animals

· If you go into a field of farm animals, keep as far as possible from the animals and keep your dog on a short lead or under close control

· If cattle react aggressively and move towards you, keep calm, let the dog go and take the shortest, safest route out of the field

· During the bird breeding season (usually April to July), keep your dog under close control or on a short lead in areas such as moorland, forests, grassland, loch shores and the seashore

· Pick up and remove your dog’s faeces if it fouls in a public open place or where there is a risk to farming interests

· Some reservoirs and streams are used for public water supply. If there are intakes nearby, keep your dog out of the water

· In recreation areas and other public places, avoid causing concern to others by keeping your dog under close control

For more information on Accommodation in the Cainrgorms National Park visit www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com For more information about the campaign to promote responsible outdoor access with dogs, please contact Justin Prigmore at the CNPA on tel: 01479 870533 or email: justinprigmore@cairngorms.co.uk

in reference to:

"As a country estate set within the Cairngorms National Park, Glen Tanar is supporting CNPA’s campaign by jointly hosting a ‘Dogs and the Code’ responsible dog ownership educational event aimed at local residents. Michael Bruce, Glen Tanar Estate Owner, says, “While we actively encourage visitors and want our countryside to be enjoyed, we do not want this to be at the expense of nature. Glen Tanar is home to an abundance of wildlife including deer and rare capercaillie making it essential that dogs are kept under close control and do not chase such wildlife. Ideally dogs should be kept on a short lead during the bird breeding season so not to upset or harm ground nesting birds or disturb their nests. “By supporting CNPA’s campaign through hosting this event, which will take place in February, Glen Tanar can work with the local community to encourage responsible behaviour among dog owners and ensure greater compliance with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. This is turn will ensure the safety of our visitors as well as the conservation of the wildlife.” Justin Prigmore, CNPA’s Outdoor Access Officer says, “The Cairngorms National Park is home to 16,000 residents and tourism related business accounts for 80% of the park’s economy. The support received by Glen Tanar in conveying our message to its local residents and visitors is very welcomed as only by working with local landowners can our campaign be a success”. There are nine key points that The Scottish Outdoor Access Code recommends to dog owners, which are promoted at CNPA ‘Dogs and the Code’ events: · Don’t take your dog into fields where there are lambs, calves or other young animals · Don’t take your dog into fields of vegetables or fruit unless you are on a clear path, such as a core path or right of way, but keep your dog to the path · Never let your dog worry or attack farm animals · If you go into a field of farm animals, keep as far as possible from the animals and keep your dog on a short lead or under close control · If cattle react aggressively and move towards you, keep calm, let the dog go and take the shortest, safest route out of the field · During the bird breeding season (usually April to July), keep your dog under close control or on a short lead in areas such as moorland, forests, grassland, loch shores and the seashore · Pick up and remove your dog’s faeces if it fouls in a public open place or where there is a risk to farming interests · Some reservoirs and streams are used for public water supply. If there are intakes nearby, keep your dog out of the water · In recreation areas and other public places, avoid causing concern to others by keeping your dog under close control For more information on Glen Tanar visit www.glentanar.co.uk or call 013398 86451. For more information about the campaign to promote responsible outdoor access with dogs, please contact Justin Prigmore at the CNPA on tel: 01479 870533 or email: justinprigmore@cairngorms.co.uk"
- Glen Tanar Estate Promotes Responsible Dog Ownership | Dog Advice (view on Google Sidewiki)

Thursday, 19 November 2009

Cairngorms Christmas - Lets Find father Christmas

AVIEMORE

Over the weekends of December 12/13, 19/20 and on the 24th, Santa will be on board his very own express train at the Strathspey Railway, bringing seasonal cheer to those making the trips from Aviemore to Broomhill and back through splendid Highland scenery. Trains run at 11am and 2pm, with children under 12 receiving a gift from Santa, while all others enjoy mulled wine, soft drink and mincemeat pies.

Advance booking is essential. Call 01479 810 725 or visit http://src.insch.info.

The Cairngorm Reindeer Centre, Glenmore, has Christmas fun and activities daily, with Santa in attendance from 10am-4pm on December 5/6, 12/13 and 19-24.

Call 01479 861228 or visit www.reindeer-company.demon.co.uk

At the Highland Wildlife Park at Kincraig you can meet Santa Claus and the park’s latest arrival, Mercedes the polar bear. Mulled drinks and mincemeat pies are available in the Polar Kiosk. Youngsters go free by downloading a voucher on the website, www.highlandwildlifepark.org. See Santa on December 5/6, 12/13 and 19/20.

On Christmas Eve, there will be a torchlight procession, led by a pipe band, Santa Claus and his reindeer from the village hall to the Cairngorm Hotel, where there will be a carol service, Gluwein, mincemeat pies and fireworks from 6pm. Torches can be bought on the street and during the parade.

KINGUSSIE

The Highland villa has a special Christmas shopping day, with pipe band, Santa’s grotto and switching on of the Christmas lights on Sunday, December 6, from noon-5pm.

On Christmas Eve, there’s a pipe band, carol singing, mulled wine, and mincemeat pies from 6.30pm, with Santa and his reindeer arriving at 7.30pm.

NEWTONMORE

On Christmas Eve, from 8.30pm, there’s a Santa parade with sleigh and reindeer from the Glen Hotel to the Highlander Hotel.

 

 

Wednesday, 18 November 2009

SPEYSIDE Wildlife, based near Aviemore, runs bird, whale and mammal watching holidays in Scotland and other parts of the world, as well as mammal watching hides in the Cairngorms National Park.

Sally Dowden, who runs the firm, said: "The season has been good. At the hide we saw an increase of about 20 per cent in visitor numbers during April, May and June.

 

"On the holiday side we have definitely seen guests come to Scotland rather than going overseas this year. But the big growth area this year has been due to the drop in the exchange rate between the pound and euro which has encouraged incoming tour operators wanting to use our tours for their clients, mainly in Holland Germany."

 

She said as well as deer, osprey, capercaillie and the golden eagle, visitors are keen to see red grouse, Scottish crossbill and seabird colonies, as well as pine marten and badgers.

 

"The plus for Scotland is that we have seabird colonies that are second to none. If you are in Holland, for example, there are no cliffs so no seabird colonies. The potential to see whales and dolphins here is also far greater than in mainland Europe.

 

"The scenery that goes with it also helps, people who come here think Scotland is fantastic. So there is a general movement with things feeding off each other."

 

On the downside, 20 businesses which took part in the survey raised concerns with two seeing visitor spending drop and two suffering job losses.

 

 

Autumn watch in the Cairngorms

The Autumn watch team explore the winter wildlife of the Cairngorms on Friday 27 November. Tune in to BBC Two at 2030 to find out more as Kate Humble and Chris Packham brave the snowy slopes.

Cairngorms National Park covers a vast area of Scotland. The park is made up of 1,400 square miles of land ranging from the fringes of the Angus Glens to Laggan in the west, Ballater in Aberdeenshire and Grantown-on-Spey in the north.

Towns and communities in the park range from the Highland hub of Aviemore to the royal retreat of Crathie. At the heart of the park is, of course, the wild heart of the Cairngorm mountains.

The Cairngorms are an outdoors paradise all year round acting as home to many species of wildlife and plants as well as being the perfect place for outdoor pursuits.

Tourists flock to the area in the summer months for activities such as hill-walking, climbing and kayaking.

Haven for wildlife

In winter the snow lies deep on the mountains offering people the chance to ski and winter-climb.

Away from the slopes with the temperatures often below freezing levels the landscape is a haven for wildlife. Birds and animals take on their winter coats and plumage with ptarmigans turning white along with mountain hares and stoats.

For Accommodation check www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com

 

 

Nordic skiers not rained off

With the Winter Olympics just round the corner, focus turns to the winter sports. For some years now a Nordic ski club in the North East of Scotland has been working hard, and is now producing world-class cross-country skiers, as Katie Still reports.

in reference to:

"Nordic skiers not rained off"
- BBC SPORT | Scotland | Nordic skiers not rained off (view on Google Sidewiki)

Tuesday, 17 November 2009

Cairngorms Chef becomes longest holder of three AA Rosettes in Scotland

A DEESIDE-BASED chef has become the longest holder of three AA Rosettes in Scotland.

 

David Mutter, chef at the Darroch Learg Hotel and Restaurant, Ballater, has now held the accolade for 14 consecutive years after retaining it once again this year.

 

Mr Mutter said: “I’m happier for the boys in the kitchen to be honest. I’ve done it for 14 years and I’d be unhappy if I had lost it, but I’m more happy for the people who work with me. It’s a team effort. It’s down to a lot of their hard work.”

 

Mr Mutter works alongside two other chefs. He added that he liked to use local ingredients from around the Cairngorms including lamb, beef and venison. “I keep it all Scottish,” he said.

 

The 44-year-old Glasgow-born chef says his signature dish is fillet of Aberdeen Angus with beetroot relish, and braised oxtail pomme puree.

 

The AA now regards the establishment as an “outstanding restaurant that demands recognition well beyond the local area”.

 

The Darroch Learg was also awarded three AA red stars maintaining the hotel’s placing in the UK’s Top hotels and it has been recommended as an inspector’s choice.

 

Nigel and Fiona Franks have owned the hotel and restaurant for almost 20 years and it has been in the Franks family for close to 50 years.

 

Mr Franks said: “We are delighted to have received this accolade from the AA. The quality of food served at Darroch Learg has always been a high priority and we aim for people to enjoy great food and wine in a relaxing surrounding.”

 

For more information visit www.darrochlearg.co.uk

 

Sunday, 15 November 2009

Self Catering in the Cairngorms National Park is the only option you really need to consider

If you are considering taking some time off and want to explore one of the most picture postcard perfect areas of the UK, then the Self Catering in the Cairngorms National Park is the only option you really need to consider.  The Cairngorms in the Highlands of Scotland is an area of outstanding natural beauty and you will marvel at the wonders of the countryside and the diversity of the area you can explore and enjoy while you are away.  One of the most popular forms of accommodation in this area is the self-catering cottage as they provide you with a cosy rustic charming place to stay and make your base for your short break or holiday.  While you are on your Self Catering holiday in the Cairngorms National Park you will find there are many ways you can spend your time and one of the most popular is to enjoy walking.  All the properties in www.cairngormsholidaycottages.com  are in the heart of this world renowned walking region and you will be in the perfect locations to get access to some of the best walking in the UK.  If you have other interests such as rock climbing, skiing, water sports, or mountain biking you will be well placed for those too.  In total there are three main areas in the park for you to enjoy so depending on where you would like to stay you can select which one is best for you, these areas include:- Badenoch and Strathspey, Royal Deeside and Glenlivet. The Self Catering vacation in the Cairngorms is a great holiday or short break at anytime of the year and you will find so much choice with www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com

Electric Cars......what about our Heather Hopper?

Electric Cars......what about our Heather Hopper? It should be electric?

 

An electric car, which will be used for community transport in the Cairngorms National Park, has been unveiled. Badenoch and Strathspey Community Transport Company will use it to take people with limited access to transport to doctor's appointments and shopping. The car, which will be operated by volunteers, was launched as a Highland Council-commissioned report forecasted a decline in filling stations. CNPA said its electric vehicle could reach speeds of 70mph and has a range of 100 miles. It takes about 10 hours to recharge and can tow a small wind turbine on a trailer for charging in remote areas. Outdoor charging points have been installed in Aviemore and Grantown-on-Spey and plugs will also be fitted to the homes of the community company's volunteers. Drivers have been given special training because the car makes half the engine noise of petrol or diesel fuelled car and added caution will be needed when driving near pedestrians and cyclists.

 

David Green, convener of the CNPA, said the car was part of efforts by the park authority to tackle climate change. He said: "This is a very exciting project for everyone involved. "Testing of electric vehicles hasn't really happened outside of cities so I think what we are doing here is innovative and really quite brave." Maggie Lawson, of Badenoch and Strathspey Community Transport Company, added: "Our volunteers are delighted to be testing the car in our rural environment and very excited to be part of a project which is working towards reducing our carbon footprint." Cheap fuel The car is a joint initiative between CNPA and Perth College UHI with support from the Highland Regional Transport Partnership, Community Energy Scotland, Climate Challenge Fund and local schools and colleges.

 

I say, one electric car is not going to solve our climate change problems in the Cairngorms! To “green wash” this project as a serious effort to tackle climate change is a joke.

You've got to see this

Must-see place to visit in Scotland

Cairngorms

The Cairngorms National Park covers a huge area, 40% bigger than the Lake District, with many attractions and areas to explore, from forest walks and castles to canoeing and mountain biking for the more adventurous.

Loch Lomond

Just a few miles from Glasgow, is Loch Lomond. Call into the visitor centre at the southern tip of the Loch where you will you find information on the many campsites nearby. You can also take a boat trip across the loch to soak up the surrounding scenery.

Culloden

Inverness-shire was the location for the horrific battle of Culloden where 1,200 men lost their lives and now the National Trust for Scotland has invested in a state of the art visitor centre where you can get a sense of how the events of that day unfolded.

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle, in central Scotland, sits high up on volcanic rock and can be seen for miles around. The castle is open to visitors 7 days a week, all year round. While you’re there, explore the Palace of James V and the Chapel Royal of James VI.

Loch Ness

A must-see place to visit is Loch Ness ? the largest body of water in Scotland and home to the famous Loch Ness Monster! The loch itself is more than 20 miles long and a mile wide and boasts some fantastic, unspoilt scenery and wildlife.

Whichever part of Scotland you’re heading to, or what time of year you’re planning your trip in your motor home, you’re bound to be amazed by the stunning landscape that the country has to offer.

For more information on places to stay www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com

 

 

www.cairngormsholidaycottages.com

 

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Saturday, 14 November 2009

Cairngorms Holiday Cottages...No1 for Holiday Info

Travelling is an absolute luxury that we all love the opportunity to have. Going off to those all inclusive resorts where everything is taken care of for you can be quite exhilarating and relaxing, but at the same time very expensive. Taking into consideration, the financial situation many are finding themselves in, self catering holidays have become extremely popular, with Scotland as a favoured location for many people. One such location is a well renowned areas of self catering holiday cottages, called Cairngorms National Park, which is receiving rave reviews and plaudits from its many visitors for its accommodation and its beautiful scenery. Their website is www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com .

 

Beautiful scenery, serenity, comfort and cost, these are the reasons why so many people are opting for a self catering Scotland experience. You can cut costs while still unwinding and choosing when you want to eat and what activities you want to do at your own pace. Break out of the routine offered by those all inclusive conglomerates and enjoy a self catering holiday in Scotland.

 

A self catering holiday Scotland vacation allows you to experience the beautiful countryside, the culture and the all natural atmosphere on your own time. No more rushing to the buffet before it closes or waiting in line for hours to get one drink from the open bar. If you are looking for that extra special getaway then why not plan for a self catering Highland dream getaway.

 

Cairngorms Holiday Cottages offers a variety of holiday cottages that you can rent that are set in some of the most beautiful countryside that you can see anywhere in the world. The Highlands of Scotland is widely known for its character and pristine scenery and Aviemore and Cairngorms Holiday Cottages is the perfect selection of luxury and a rustic holiday homes.

 

For further information on visit www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com

 

Friday, 13 November 2009

Have an Eco- Christmas, here in the Cairngorms National Park!









Have an Eco- Christmas, here in the Cairngorms National Park!




Christmas is normally the time of year when people do everything to excess. Sending cards, buying presents, having a tree which only goes up for a couple of weeks, travelling to see family, more energy than usual on lighting and heating and food miles on the excessive amount of food we buy. All these activities contribute to a fabulous Christmas, but also contribute to damaging the environment. Here at Highland Holiday Cottages in the Cairngorm National Park we have decided to have an Eco-Christmas!







Although to be honest, it works to our advantage, so it’s not all holy!




We are sending E-cards to our friends, family and guests, which means that not only are we not adding to the landfill but we are saving money too!




The few cards that Highland Holiday Cottages will send, are to people who aren’t yet internet-savvy, but we would still want to wish them festive cheer! But rest assured, the cards are either recycled and bought from charity shops or recycle by Sian. It is easy to recycle Christmas cards from last year. We received so many from previous guests and friends of Crubenbeg Highland Holiday Cottages, that we took the decision last year to recycle them for this year! It’s fun to do with kids as well!







As for presents, well how about shopping in a charity shop? I know it’s not original, but no one will know! Kids especially won’t care if the board game or computer game they receive is from the charity shop. It is tricky because you want to give beautifully wrapped presents but wrapping paper adds to the landfill at the end (along with all the food leftovers!). Again, using recycled wrapping paper, and buying from a charity shop all help. How about using wrapping that can be reused again and again?




Buying from the charity shop and all the other things in this blog won’t ‘ruin’ Christmas for your children... If you make it into an educational game, encouraging children to find environmentally friendly alternatives to their usual Christmas excess they can have fun, learn and help the world around them.







Decorating the house can be done environmentally friendly-wise as well. How about some real holly? Here at Highland Holiday Cottages, we will be searching out for some real holly!




We have been using reusable Christmas trees in all the cottages of Highland Holiday Cottages for three years now, so reducing the number of trees going to waste!




Take up a new hobby and give the same gift to everyone! I know it sounds cheap, but how about learning to sew, or knit and giving tea cosies... or if you get good at knitting, try socks!




With regard to cutting down on food miles, we have been growing all of our own brussel sprouts, potatoes, carrots and parsnips for the last three years and it doesn’t get any better than the taste of all your own hard work in the garden of Crubenbeg!




We are working towards keeping the Cairngorm National Park as beautiful as possible for many years to come!




Have a Happy Festive Season from Crubenbeg Highland Holiday Cottages in the Cairngorm National Park!




Cairngorm herd bring Christmas joy as it visits towns throughout the UK

THEY may not have red noses – but members of the Cairngorm reindeer herd are as busy as Rudolph as they gear up for the busy Christmas season.

Groups from the Glenmore centre near Aviemore are already on the road making visits to towns and villages throughout the UK, bringing festive joy to young and old.

One group made an annual visit to Harrods department store in Knightsbridge, London, last week, and a trip to Truro in Cornwall for another group is planned.

Herder Ceris Owen said that, at their peak, nine teams, each with six reindeer, would be making visits across the country.

Ms Owen said staff are also training six-month-old calves to wear special collars so they too can go on the visits.

She said: “It is good for the young ones so that they know what to expect when they are older.

“Attending events will not be as stressful for them if they know that it means lots of food rather than lots of scary people.”

The reindeer stay at farms and animal centres up and down the country during their travels so that they can rest properly.

Staff at the centre at Glenmore are also leading trips up into the Cairngorms so that people can see the reindeer in their natural habitat.

One group of reindeer will be at The Mall in Aberdeen from noon tomorrow.

in reference to: Reindeer set to go out and sleigh them - Press & Journal (view on Google Sidewiki)

Thursday, 12 November 2009

Heather's video points to Scots mountain blackspots

Scotland’s hillwalking safety supremo features in a short video detailing the four main accident blackspots for walkers and climbers as winter conditions take hold.

Heather Morning, mountain safety adviser with the Mountaineering Council of Scotland, offers advice on how to deal with the principal sites in the Highlands where hillgoers come to grief. The blackspots are in Glencoe, Lochaber and the Cairngorms.

Top of the mountain rescue hit parade is Ben Nevis though, as Heather points out, this is because of its popularity, with more than 200,000 ascents each year. However, in bad conditions and poor visibility, which are more likely than not to be expected on Britain’s highest mountain, navigational errors can lead to trouble. southern side of the mountain. Although the sheer rock faces of Ben Nevis’s northern gullies are true climbing territory, they are fairly obvious, even in bad weather, though cornices will build up in winter. It’s the less apparent pitfalls of Five Finger Gully and Coire Eòghainn that could catch unaware walkers out. The corrie in particular is in line with the direct grid bearing of 231 degrees that leads from the summit cairn. Walkers need to be aware that, after 150m, they should turn right and follow a grid bearing of 282 degrees to steer clear of the perils of Five Finger Gully, the top of which lies within 100m of the tourist zigzags leading back down to Lochain Meall an t-Suidhe.

Glencoe scores twice in the blackspot league, with the pinnacles of Aonach Eagach and the ill advised descent route down the Clachaig Gully both potentially fatal. And on the other side of the glen, the normally safe, if scree-bound, ascent of Buachaille Etive Mòr via Coire na Tulaich is particularly prone to avalanche, due to its north-facing aspect. In January this year, three mountaineers perished in one such incident in the corrie.

The final blackspot on Heather’s six-minute verbal tour of the Highlands is on Cairn Gorm’s northern corries: the Goat Track in Coire an t-Sneachda passes under some of the most popular winter climbing routes and the main danger here is from rocks and other debris dislodged by climbers on the gullies above.

Heather, who is also a member of the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team, is clear that the four blackspots are not to be avoided necessarily. But an awareness of the potential pitfalls is vital and the consideration of alternative routes should always be at the forefront of walkers and climbers in Scotland if the risk of accidents is to be minimised.

The video was produced by TGO Video with the MCofS, is backed up by further safety advice on the council’s website.

in reference to:

"Heather's video points to Scots mountain blackspots"
- grough — Outdoors Magazine — Heather's video points to Scots mountain blackspots (view on Google Sidewiki)

Three day castle and history exploration in the Cairngorms National Park

Renting a car in Scotland and touring the wild and impressive surroundings is the highlight of most vacations in Scotland. Cheap Scotland car rental is easy and available in all major cities. Here is asuggestion for a three day castle exploration.

Day 1

Stating from Glasgow or Edinburgh, link up with the A93 at Perth and follow it throughout Glenshee, to Braemar, the eastern entryway to the Cairngorm Mountains. Drop in on Braemar Highland Heritage Centre and 17th century Braemar Castle, which is nowadays run by the local community. Remain on the A93 to Balmoral Castle, Queen Victoria’s ‘dear cloud nine where all over you look seems to breathe liberty and peace. Fu

rther east, the old royal station at Ballater consists of a royal carriage and royal waiting room built for Queen Victoria.

You can reveal ad

ditional ancient

history at the Kinord Stone, a 9th century Celtic symbol stone in Muir of Dinnet National Nature Reserve before leaving the A93 for the A97 up to Strathdon, where a small deviation will bring you to the ruined 16th century Glenbuchat Castle, now protected by Historic Scotland, who also uphold magnificent Corgarff Castle, a 16th century tower house set in natural scenery in Upper Strathdon on the A939 to Tomintoul.

Stop at the b

ottom of the Lecht pass to visit the Lecht Mine - active during the 18th and 19th centuries.Go on to the intended 18th century township of Tomintoul with its square, museum, telford church and manse.

Day 2

Begin the day from Tomintoul and head north on the A939 and take the right hand turning after Bridge of Avon. Just next to the road is Fodderletter Lum - sited there by early road menders to provide protection at night. Stay on Strathavon and turn left onto the B9136 to marvelous 15th century Drumin Castle, sometime home of the Wolf of Badenoch.

Continue to Bridgend of Glenlivet and turn right onto the B9008 to the ancient Livet pack horse bridge after quarter of a mile. Continue to Auchnarrow and take a left turning signposted Chapeltown and Scalan.

Park at the end of the road and walk a mile on level ground to find the splendid Forbidden College of Scalan where Roman Catholic priests were trained in secret during the 18th century. End the day at Grantown and enjoy an evening of local hospitality.

Day 3

From Grantown, head south and maybe visit excellent Castle Roy by Nethybridge on your way to the ruined 18th century Ruthven Barracks near Kingussie, which were built following the first Jacobite uprising.

From here it’s on to Clan MacPherson Museum at Newtonmore, where you will also find part of the multi award winning wonderful Highland Folk Museum where a 1700s township has been recreated.

To finish head south past Dun da Lamh Pictish Hillfort at Laggan Bridge before taking the A9 south to Blair Atholl and outstanding Blair Castle, home of the Atholl Highlanders - the only remaining private army in the UK. This area is soon to become part of the Aviemore & Cairngorms National Park

For other self-catering ideas - www.CairngormsHolidayCottages.com is the place for slefcatering holiday accommodation.

Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Aviemore is based in the highlands of Scotland, with impressive mountain views, and surrounded by country-side it stands 26,000 feet above rural farmland. The area is renowned for skiing, having recently had British Army Competitions on its snowy peaks in the last two months. The ski resorts success, with professional skiing has also lead to success with tourists, having thousands people hitting the slopes each month. These massive numbers are also attributed to snowboarding, with boarding specific parks on one side of the mountain.

 

Aviemore recently commissioned a state of the art ski train that can travel up to 15 miles per hour, withstand winds in excess of 110 miles per hour. The amazing structure travels from the base to the top and is certainly an amazing sight for any avid skier

 

Aviemore is an unfortunate to only have snow for 4-5 months in the year, ruling it out of hosting many competitions, and really placing Scotland up there with as one the top skiing destinations in Scotland. The skiing destination has recently hosted the snowboarding  freestyle championships

 

With a thriving economy that survives largely of the tourism industry, Aviemore had the facilities to bed over 2,000 people a night,. The reasons for this was largely down to its proximity to a local town that was also able to provide bed and breakfast and self-catering accommodation. If you have never been to Aviemore then I recommend you visit, whether or not you are a skier. The fact is, the views are amazing, the fresh clear air is refreshing and the people are fantastic. If you have never skied before, then what better place to learn than Aviemore. www.AveimoreHolidayCottages.com for all you holiday ideas and accommodation.

 

AVIEMORE snowboarder Lesley McKenna

AVIEMORE snowboarder Lesley McKenna crashed out of the latest World Cup half-pipe contest in spectacular style - but, fortunately, escaped without injury.

he 35-year-old had the "best bail of the day" on Friday according to British World Cup Half-pipe Team coach Leo Addington.

She caught her heel edge on the coping of the ladies' halfpipe in the second event of the 2009 LG FIS Snowboard World Cup Half-pipe Tour in Saas Fee in Switzerland.

McKenna told the 'Strathy': "I was riding pretty well in training and I have found a different model of Nidecker board that works better for me so things are progressing.

"I was a bit unlucky in the competition and caught an edge on the coping first run coming in from a 720 and pretty much flew three metres onto my head.

in reference to:

"he 35-year-old had the "best bail of the day" on Friday according to British World Cup Half-pipe Team coach Leo Addington.She caught her heel edge on the coping of the ladies' halfpipe in the second event of the 2009 LG FIS Snowboard World Cup Half-pipe Tour in Saas Fee in Switzerland.McKenna told the 'Strathy': "I was riding pretty well in training and I have found a different model of Nidecker board that works better for me so things are progressing."I was a bit unlucky in the competition and caught an edge on the coping first run coming in from a 720 and pretty much flew three metres onto my head."
- Snowboard star 'unlucky' as heel catches - Strathspey and Badenoch Herald (view on Google Sidewiki)

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